End of the car age: how cities are outgrowing the automobile

Cities around the world are coming to the same conclusion: they’d be better off
with far fewer cars. So what’s behind this seismic shift in our urban lifestyles?
Stephen Moss goes on an epic (car-free) journey to find out

Link to the original article here.

London’s Oxford Street in 1965.

London’s Oxford Street in 1965, when city planning was dominated by a desire to accommodate the car. Photograph: Powell/Getty Images

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The Steady Rise of Bike Ridership in New York

Advocates say the latest numbers are encouraging, but the city could still be
doing more.

Link to the original article here.

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The newest commuter cycling numbers are out for New York City, and they’re
bigger than ever. The latest count available from the city’s transportation
department shows a 4 percent increase over the previous year, as measured
during 2014’s peak cycling season at key points in New York’s bike network
[PDF]. The 12-hour weekday count at seven data-collection points was up to
21,112—compared to an anemic 5,631 in 2002.

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That news won’t likely come as a surprise to many New Yorkers, who now
routinely see bikes outnumbering cars on some streets during rush hour. A
generation ago, a person on a bike was almost by definition an outlier who
defied the norm (and maybe common sense, given the city’s chaotic traffic
culture). Today, it’s not unusual to see parents calmly riding their kids to school
before they head off to work themselves on two wheels. Continue reading

How can changing the language used to talk about an issue help with conversation?

HOW SMART LANGUAGE HELPED END SEATTLE’S PARALYZING BIKELASH

February 04, 2015

Michael Andersen, Green Lane Project staff writer

Link to the original article on People for Bikes found here.


Broadway, Seattle.

Instead of “cyclists,” people biking. Instead of “accident,” collision. Instead of “cycle track,”protected bike lane.

It can come off as trivial word policing. But if you want proof that language shapes thoughts, look no further than Seattle — where one of the country’s biggest bikelashes has turned decisively around in the last four years.

For a while in 2010 and 2011, the three-word phrase “war on cars,” which had risen to prominence in Rob Ford’s Toronto and spread to Seattle in 2009, threatened to poison every conversation about improving bicycling in the city.

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